The Importance of Franchisors Building Relationships With Their Franchisees

The Importance of Franchisors Building Relationships With Their Franchisees…

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“Over my forty-plus years representing franchisors, I have seen too many franchisors fail because they do not realize how important it is for their franchisees to succeed and make money.”

The Importance of Franchisors Building Relationships With Their Franchisees
By Gary Occhiogrosso- Founder of Franchise Growth Solutions, LLC.

When Onboarding new franchisees the franchisor should always remember that a common thread to success is the franchisor’s culture of support, co-operation, communication, education, and profitability with their franchisees. Building an ongoing relationship with its franchise community can mean the difference between growing a restaurant brand to hundreds of units or failing before ever making a mark in the industry.

Without these critical components in place, a restaurant franchisee can quickly go “off the rails” and compromise brand standards. It’s not long before many of these franchisees negatively redefine the brand. Poor service, improperly prepared menu items, lesser quality ingredients and overall appearance and cleanliness of the restaurant are just a few reasons why a healthy relationship with your franchise owner is essential.

It Starts At the Beginning.

Creating the proper franchisor /franchisee relationship builds success for both. This relationship building must begin right from the start. Successful restaurant franchisors know that ramp-up time and getting a new restaurant profitable takes smart planning and hard work by both the franchisor and the franchisee. The training, support, communication and ongoing assistance the franchisee receives early on in the relationship can set the tone for the entire term of the franchise agreement.

One of the most crucial steps a franchisor can take begins when selecting a franchisee. Franchisors should conduct an in-depth interview as part of a thorough vetting process. Along with the obvious discussions such as past management and business experience, time commitment to the operation and funding, franchisors must also explore the core business values of the franchise candidate. Spending this time upfront to examine the candidate’s vision, expectations and the overall business plan goes a long way into understanding if the potential franchisee shares common goals with the franchisor. It is also the first step in building brand value and a robust, lasting business relationship.

Increase Your Communication And Reduce Your Failure

New businesses can fail for a variety of reasons. Although the vast number of restaurant failures are due to undercapitalization, it could also be the result of substandard operations, inefficient marketing, poor location and changing consumer trends. In addition, a failure in a franchised restaurant may be the result of the franchisee working outside the franchisor’s branded system. Franchisees can destroy their business by implementing procedures and introducing products that are counterintuitive to the brand image. Franchise owners often lack the time, experience and money to do proper research on a new product or a new procedure, never realizing that it may disrupt the entire system. Conversely, franchisors must always be aware and teach the idea that “everything touches everything else.” Building a healthy relationship and a clear channel of communication with the franchise owner can often prevent franchise owners from circumventing the system in the first place.

Harold Kestenbaum noted franchise attorney who has specialized in franchise law and other matters relating to franchising since 1977 explains: “Over my forty-plus years representing franchisors, I have seen too many franchisors fail because they do not realize how important it is for their franchisees to succeed and make money. Franchising is a two-way street, and to be a successful franchisor, you, as the franchisor, must understand this and make it happen. Franchisors cannot be successful if they think that it’s only them who should make money. Ray Kroc knew that franchising could only work if the franchisees made money along with the franchisor. Supporting your franchisees from the outset, and not when they are choking is imperative and franchisors need to realize this. One such way to make this collaborative effort work is by creating a franchisee advisory board. Franchisors with more than ten franchisees need to implement this without the franchisees asking for this. A franchisee advisory board will show the franchisees that you are trying to make them be a part of the system and that you want their input. Franchising is not an autocratic method of doing business; it is a collaborative method of doing business.”

Looking in the Mirror Helps

It’s easier to blame the franchisee for failure than franchisors like to admit. Franchisee behavior is often a reflection of the franchisor. Some franchisors are quick to dismiss why proper onboarding, relationship building, creating brand value, and adequate franchise support are vital to the success of the new business. When a franchisee loses confidence in the franchisor, it is complicated to turn back. Franchisees stray or “go rogue” because franchisors fail to supply the “rails” that the franchisee must run on.

An open, working relationship between the franchisor and the franchisee is the most important aspect of brand success. Franchisors must take a very active role in the franchise operation, perhaps more than they want. Supplying great tools, conducting superior training, regular visits to the restaurant to evaluate the goals and progress of the business is a crucial commitment a franchisor must make. Communication, transparency, ongoing coaching and counseling are the essential elements of relationship building. The ROI for these efforts will be opening hundreds or even thousands of franchised restaurants locations.

Find Out if Franchising is Suitable for your Business

Franchise Your Business: www.franchisegrowthsolutions.com


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A business ‘partnership’ in which one party permits the other ‘partners’ to replicate a proven business system, operating under a common brand, in return for initial and on-going fees. It allows a third party to legally copy your business in exchange for an upfront payment and on-going management services fees.

Is Franchising suitable for your Business
By Daniel Kidd

A business ‘partnership’ in which one party permits the other ‘partners’ to replicate a proven business system, operating under a common brand, in return for initial and on-going fees.

It allows a third party to legally copy your business in exchange for an upfront payment and on-going management services fees.

To franchise a business you need the following factors

• Sufficient development capital to establish a franchise system
• High enough margins to share
• Existing business network or ‘pilots’
• Easily transferable knowledge
• Identifiable brand or trademark
• Expansion requires investment into property, equipment and staff

The Benefits

• Franchise fees will generate a stream of capital income and ongoing revenue
• A loss of profit margin will be offset by much larger overall revenues
• Motivated franchisees ‘running their own businesses’ will generate higher per unit income than employees

What can be franchised?

• Very diverse range of businesses
• Proven business systems capable of replication
• Profitable businesses financially viable for both parties and financially secure
• Steady or growing demand for your products or services
• Simple business formats that are easy to learn
• Identifiable brands and trademarks with your own distinctive image or concept

Undertake a SWOT Analysis of your brand

Trading History

• How long have you been in business?
• What is proven?

Profit Margins

• Are these above average industry benchmark?
• Is there enough margin for two?

Market

• How big is your market?
• How volatile is your market?
• Does it have mass appeal?

Products

• Is there consumer acceptance of your product?
• Is your product or service easy to sell and deliver?
• Quality record?

Brand

• Is your Intellectual Property protected?
• Is there a unique and distinguishable marketing approach?
• What is your reputation in the market place

Business Management

• Do you have the management skills and capacity to create a new culture?
• Is your business professional and well presented?
• Is your management financially skilled?
• Do you have well documented processes and systems in use?
• How is Information Technology used in your business?
• What is your attitude to risk?
• Is there a commitment to research and development?

Franchise Opportunity

• Do you have sufficient access to development capital to fund growth?
• Are there similar franchises already on the market?
• Will the franchisee be able to control their costs?
• What will be the minimum term?

Reasons for failure

• Growing too fast too soon
• Franchising for the wrong reasons
• Lack of planning
• Selecting the wrong franchisees
• Lack of infrastructure and support
• Failure to take proper advice

Review your SWOT

Do you have the key criteria you need to franchise

• Developed systems of operation and staffing
• Defined image and clear market position
• Proven and successful business model
• Sustainable market and source of ongoing clients
• Easily duplicated management systems
• Profitability for both parties
• Mutual respect and support – partnership
• Will your operating experience and culture allow you to develop a franchise operation?
• Are your products or services suitable for franchising?
• Is your Brand sufficiently well developed and strong enough to deliver a worthwhile advantage to a franchisee?
• Is your financial position strong enough to support a franchise network?
• Is your business system provenFind Article, robust and capable of being learned by a franchisee?
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Daniel Kidd writes about a range for business and franchising topics. For more information please visit Coach Franchise.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com
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Franchise Your Business: www.franchisegrowthsolutions.com

So you’ve decided to franchise your business. Now what?

There are a number of resources available to you as a business owner, and it’s important to take advantage of those resources right from the start of your franchise system. It’s also important to consider hiring a franchise lawyer to help navigate all the legal paperwork you will have to conduct prior to rolling out your franchise program.

So you’ve decided to franchise your business. Now what?

Harold Kestenbaum
President at HLK P.C. Law Firm | Franchise Lawyer

So your going to franchise your business. The first thing you need to do is ask yourself these questions:

Is there profit potential with my business?
Is my business unique enough to franchise?
Do I have a good story that people will want to buy?
What can I offer to franchisees that they couldn’t get anywhere else?

In franchising there are so many critical details you must look at before you’re able to make an educated decision on your business future. Determining the answers to these four questions is an excellent first step. If you’re unable to answer these with confidence, it may be time to step back and reconsider your desire to franchise. There’s nothing wrong with that — it just may not be the right time for your business.

With that said, it is nearly impossible to know everything there is to know about franchising if you’re just getting into the industry. There are companies with 15+ years of franchise experience that are still learning new things every day. One of the most advantageous things you can do in these early stages of your franchise is to enlist the help of industry experts.

There are a number of resources available to you as a business owner, and it’s important to take advantage of those resources right from the start of your franchise system. It’s also important to consider hiring a franchise lawyer to help navigate all the legal paperwork you will have to conduct prior to rolling out your franchise program.

Another useful resource as you maneuver through the minutia of the franchise world is my book, So You Want To Franchise Your Business. It’s a comprehensive guide to help you understand each step you need to take before franchising, the legal documentation you will need before that starts and best of all, it will answer all four of those burning franchise questions.

So you’ve decided to franchise your business. Click our logo below to for more franchise information or give me a call (516) 745-0099, to receive a free consultation and get franchising today!