The Success of Acai Express – Now a Franchise in the USA.

“We provide a system that is simple to operate with no experience needed.” Our Acai Berries are harvested from the Amazon Rainforest. This discourages deforestation while at the same time creating financial opportunities for local farmers. We are committed to a culture of appreciation to our guests, franchisees, and team members.’
– Hector Westerband, Founder, and CEO – Acai Express

Watch The Founder of Acai Express explain the reasons why Acai Express is a hit.
https://lnkd.in/dhearqw

The Success of Acai Express – Now a Franchise in the USA.

Our story starts with crashing waves and bustling street corners. In July 2013, Hector Westerband, an avid surfer, founded Acai Express in his homeland of Puerto Rico. Beginning with a single food truck in Guaynabo, Hector wanted to promote a healthy lifestyle centered on the nutrient-rich acai berry. The rapid popularity of his food truck meant he quickly expanded the brand to open franchises elsewhere on the island (13 locations in Puerto Rico as of 2018…)

At Acai Express our mission is to provide our customers the best experience with the highest quality products. We strive to promote a healthy existence by offering customers a lifestyle brand with products that benefit our minds, our bodies, and our souls. Our products are created with the active and health-conscious consumer in mind creating a socially responsible business model.

Our Acai Berries are harvested from the Amazon Rainforest. This discourages deforestation while at the same time creating financial opportunities for local farmers. We are committed to a culture of appreciation to our guests, franchisees, and team members.

As an Acai Express franchisee you will benefit from distinct competitive advantages. We provide an innovative marketing program with a unique and lively shop design. Our menu offers 100% organic “Grade A” acai with other high-quality products and has all day sales potential. With three flexible business models, we provide a system that is simple to operate with no experience needed. Our franchise model offers a low-cost entry, with protected territories, comprehensive training, and an experienced management team.

For franchise information please contact:[email protected]
Notice Regarding Franchise Offers and Sales

This information is not intended as an offer to sell, or the solicitation of an offer to buy, a franchise. It is for information purposes only. There are approximately 14 countries and 15 US states that regulate the offer and sale of franchises. The countries are Australia, Brazil, Belgium, Canada (provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Ontario and Prince Edward Island), China, France, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Russia, South Korea, Spain, and the United States of America. The US states are California, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. If you are a resident of one of these states or countries, are receiving this message in one of these states or countries, or intend to operate a franchise in any of these states or countries, we will not offer you a franchise unless and until we have complied with any applicable pre-sale registration and/or disclosure requirements in the applicable jurisdiction.
This offering is not an offering of a franchise. In New York (USA), an offering of a franchise can only be made by a prospectus that has been previously filed and registered with the Department of Law of the State of New York. The application for registration of an offering prospectus or the acceptance and filing thereof by the Department of Law as required by the New York law does not constitute approval of the offering or the sale of such franchise by the Department of Law or the attorney general of New York.
© 2017 Harold L. Kestenbaum, Esq.

2nd edition in our “Coach, Mentor & Grow®” video series for Franchisors

Here’s the 2nd edition in our “Coach, Mentor & Grow®” video series for Franchisors. The panel at the NY FBN/IFA meeting covered the topic of “Franchising and Private Equity- How to Position your Company” Panelist Oz Bengur, Lisa Oak, Grant Marcks and Roger Lipton. Hosted by David Azrin Esq.

If you’d like to receive the entire 1-hour session please contact us at [email protected]

Watch the video: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gary-occhiogrosso/detail/recent-activity/shares/

To Be or Not to Be a Franchisee: 3 Key Questions to Consider

When starting a business from scratch, entrepreneurs should be well versed in every single element of the enterprise. They need to create systems and procedures and test whether these work for that particular business. This process of ironing out the details deters some from choosing to own an independent business but excites and challenges others.


To Be or Not to Be a Franchisee: 3 Key Questions to Consider

This article is written and owned by Paul Segreto, CFE
CEO Franchise Foundry, Top 100 Champion 2014 Small Business Influencer Awards

The dream of owning your own business is alive and well for most Americans. The only problem is that many people don’t know where to start on the journey to becoming self-sufficient. There are a million different options, but first and foremost each potential entrepreneur must decide if he or she wants to become a franchisee or start a business independently.

Each route has its benefits; therefore it’s critical to take the time to consider both options before making a decision. What it initially comes down to is asking yourself the following questions:

1. Do you understand every aspect of the business or do you thrive in one area?

When starting a business from scratch, entrepreneurs should be well versed in every single element of the enterprise. They need to create systems and procedures and test whether these work for that particular business. This process of ironing out the details deters some from choosing to own an independent business but excites and challenges others.

Conversely someone who buys a franchise knows that someone else has already done the “dirty work” and found the most effective systems for that particular business. A franchisee must simply thrive at correctly running the system while adding their own personal management touch.

2. Are you an expert at making a name for yourself or would you like to be associated with an already strong brand?

When purchasing a franchise, you are also inheriting the reputation of that brand. For example, if you open your own Dunkin’ Donuts shop, you will encounter customers who already recognize the pink and orange logo. Many people will know whether they like the brand and will expect speedy service providing them doughnuts and steaming hot coffee.

On the other hand, those starting a business from scratch have a chance to create a unique brand identity. But consumer trust and awareness don’t come easily; they need to be earned through time, consistency and excellence.

3. Are you the kind of person who likes to go it alone or do you appreciate a sense of community?

Owning a business — whether it’s a franchise or not — can be risky. Some people prefer to be self-reliant and want to manage potential problems using past experiences and premonitions as guides. An entrepreneur must solve the issues that arise.

Others prefer enlisting the support and help of others to ensure that their business runs smoothly. A franchisee has many built-in allies, including the franchisor and other franchisees within the system.

The most important factor for success is making sure that problems are identified and steps are taken in the right direction.
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Paul Segreto brings unique perspective, entrepreneurial spirit and extensive industry experience to franchise management and development. For over thirty years he has exclusively served the franchise industry as consultant and coach, senior-level corporate executive, advocate, multi-unit franchisee and area developer.

Dedicated to franchise success at all levels, Paul has consulted with founders and franchise executives of start-up and emerging franchise concepts, franchisees experiencing difficult challenges in their daily operations, and with independent small business owners discovering franchising as a business expansion strategy or income diversification plan.

Understanding the franchise sales process from lead generation through franchise award, and the importance of forming an interdependent relationship between franchisee and franchisor, Paul has successfully developed and executed marketing and development strategies for franchisors across a variety of franchise segments.

As franchise candidates and consumers have become more sophisticated and technologically advanced, Paul has embraced social technology and social media marketing, and has identified both as essential to future franchise growth at all levels. Developed, “Get Off Your Ass Marketing!” and other successful revenue and profit generating programs for franchise organizations in the United States and abroad.

Paul is the founder and host of the popular internet radio show, Franchise Today, has co-founded FranSummit, a virtual training platform to provide effective eLearning solutions for the franchise community, and founded Personal Branding for Franchise Professionals to assist all who work within franchising to develop personal branding strategies to align individual experience and expertise with brand and business development. He is an active member of various franchise associations including International Franchise Association (IFA).

Specialties:Paul is a recognized franchise and social media expert and frequently serves as a guest speaker / topic leader for webinars, focus groups, strategy and sales planning meetings, training sessions and industry panels. He is frequently called upon to utilize his expertise in the development of articles for industry blogs and publications, and training programs for companies and organizations within the industry.

How Affirmations Set The Tone For Your Success

Have you created your affirmations yet? If not, take time right now to get started. Even a few positive statements can have a wonderful impact on your business to attract clients

How Affirmations Set The Tone For Your Success
This article is written and owned by Fabienne Fredrickson

If you are working to attract clients and create a positive mindset, affirmations will help get you there. What a difference they can make! In case you aren’t familiar with this mindset technique, an affirmation is a positive statement about a goal you want to achieve, written in the present tense as if it is happening right now.

The First Step is to Write Your Affirmations. You want to craft a series of positive statements about the goals you wish to accomplish. For example, you might write about your business:

– I attract clients easily and my business is flourishing and growing. – This year my income will reach $___ or higher (be specific!). – I find the ideal virtual assistant who will help my business grow.

You might also write a few for your personal life:

– I feel energetic and excited today. – Good things come easily to me. – I love my life, my family and my home.

Affirmations Need to Be Positive. Make sure these statements are written about what you want to attract or feel versus what you don’t want. For example, you want to avoid affirmations like: “In the future, I don’t attract clients who can’t afford my fee.” This sentence has two things working against it: 1) Putting the time frame out into the future vs. making it about now. 2) Talking about what you don’t want instead of what you do want.

Here’s how to turn this statement around so that it will work for you: “I attract ideal clients who pay my fee easily and get great results working with me.”

These positive statements set you up energetically with an optimistic outlook about what you want. For affirmations to work, you need to repeat them on a regular basis so they get into your subconscious mind, which is the place where all manifesting originates.

Use Affirmations Twice a Day. I recommend working with affirmations at least twice a day. In the morning after waking, you are in this foggy place where you can bypass the conscious mind and go straight to the subconscious. The other ideal time is at night when you are fading before falling asleep. Both times give you access to that part of your brain.

Try Positive Expectations. In addition, I also hold positive expectations during the day. One of my favorites is “I am positively expecting great results no matter what I see in front of me.” I have that posted everywhere in my house and office so it has worked its way into my subconscious as well. This is a powerful tool for shifting your mindset and creating the results you desire.

Your Assignment: Have you created your affirmations yet? If not, take time right now to get started. Even a few positive statements can have a wonderful impact on your business to attract clients.

You can write them every day, read what you have written daily or speak them out loud to yourself. Take a moment at the end to express your gratitude for these statements coming true.


Fabienne Fredrickson, The Client Attraction Mentor, is founder of the Client Attraction System®, the proven step-by-step program that shows you exactly how to attract more clients, in record time…guaranteed. To get your Free CD by mail and receive her weekly articles on attracting more high-paying clients and dramatically increasing your income, visit

http://articles.submityourarticle.com/how-affirmations-set-the-tone-for-your-success-356364
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Franchise Responsibilities: Franchisor’s vs. Franchisee’s

Owning or being a part of a franchise can be complicated. If you mean to enter into a franchise you will need to know the specific roles of franchisors and franchisees.

Franchise Responsibilities: Franchisor’s vs. Franchisee’s

This article is written and owned by Charles Internicola

If you are considering buying into a franchise or allowing someone to open a branch of your preexisting franchise, you will need to know the details of the franchisor-franchisee relationship. This relationship is a business arrangement governed by contract agreement under which both parties have specific rights and responsibilities.

The Difference between a Franchisor and a Franchisee

The key differences between a franchisor and a franchisee are rights and ownership. A franchisor, as the owner of the original franchise, owns the operating system and all trademarks of the franchise. The franchisor can then allow those trademarks to be used by another through a contract.

A franchisee can purchase the rights to use the franchisor’s operating system and trademarks. The franchisee may continue to use said rights so long as the terms and conditions set forth in the franchise agreement are not violated.

Responsibilities of Franchisors vs. Franchisees

Though the franchisor-franchisee relationship is often referred to as a “parent-child” relationship, this analogy is generalized and can be misleading. While it is true that a franchisor must teach a franchisee how to operate according to the system and within set rules, to give the impression that franchisees are children is misleading at best.

Franchisees are independent business owners, responsible for the success or failure of their own business. Unless otherwise stated in the franchise agreement, franchisees are individually responsible for:

– How well the franchisor’s business model is executed;

– Whom they chose to hire;

– How much their employees are paid;

– How employees are scheduled; and

– What prices they charge for the product or service, etc.

A franchisor can give advice in these areas, but it is generally not considered the franchisor’s responsibility. Because it is in the best interest of the franchisor that the franchisee succeeds, he or she can help the franchisee through appropriate training and tools. In the end, however, the success of the business will always be up to the franchisee.

The Legal Work of Franchising

If you are considering entering into a franchisor-franchisee relationship in any capacity, it will be in your best interest to contact an experienced business lawyer. The right business lawyer will be able to ensure that the franchise contract is completely fair and beneficial to you.

As the franchisee or franchisor, you will want to have your business attorney read over the contract, offering a professional eye. As a franchisor, your business lawyer can help you draft the contract that will uphold your original franchise image and operating system in the franchisee’s new business.


Charles N. Internicola, is a franchise lawyer who represents start-up and established franchisors throughout the Unites States, in all fifty states, including New York and New Jersey. Charles is the author of “An Entrepreneurs Guide to Purchasing a Business” and he is the publisher of the “Franchise Law Blog”.

http://articles.submityourarticle.com/franchise-responsibilities-franchisor-s-vs-franchisee-s-108613

Step 6: Minimum Disclosure Timing

In most states, the minimum disclosure time is 14 calendar days before the prospect signs or pays. When counting calendar days, you may not count the day the FDD is delivered or the day the prospect signs or pays.



By Warren Lewis

(This was the sixth post in a series of 11 posts on making compliant franchise sales.)

You must disclose a prospect with the franchisor’s FDD a minimum amount of time before the prospect signs any binding agreement with, or pays any amount to, the franchisor or any affiliate.

If you are using a paper FDD or an FDD on a CD, disclosure occurs on the day you hand-deliver or otherwise actually deliver the FDD to the prospect, or 3 days after you mail the FDD to the prospect by first class mail. If you are disclosing electronically, disclosure occurs on the day you email the FDD to the prospect, or give the prospect directions for accessing the FDD on the Internet. The date on the signed and dated receipt received from the prospect for the FDD should correspond to the date disclosure occurs.

In most states, the minimum disclosure time is 14 calendar days before the prospect signs or pays. When counting calendar days, you may not count the day the FDD is delivered or the day the prospect signs or pays.

Some state laws require different minimum disclosure times (see Appendix A). If the Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Nebraska, New York, Oklahoma or Rhode Island law applies, you may be required to disclose the prospect at your first “personal meeting” with the prospect.

A “personal meeting” is a face-to-face meeting in a semi-private setting such as a restaurant or a lounge area at a trade show, or in a private setting such as a hotel conference room or your office. If the Connecticut, Maryland, Michigan, New York, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah or Washington law applies, or if you are exempt as a large franchisor in California, you may be required to disclose the prospect at least 10 business days before the prospect signs or pays.

When counting business days, you may not count the day the FDD is delivered, the day the prospect signs or pays, Saturdays, Sundays, or most federal or state holidays.

Some of the state laws requiring different minimum disclosure times may be changed, so you should check with the franchisor’s lawyer or compliance manager about when any changes might take effect.

Until all of the state laws are changed, however, your franchisor may require you to disclose all prospects at their first personal meetings and at least 10 business days before they sign or pay, just to be safe in case any of the laws apply.
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This blog is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

Raising Business Finance: The Entrepreneurs’ Journey to Executing Their Plan

Raising business finance can often be one of the most challenging times for an entrepreneur. However, part of entrepreneurialism is perseverance and determination. You have to be prepared for getting knocked down if you want to succeed.

Raising Business Finance: The Entrepreneurs’ Journey to Executing Their Plan

This article is written and owned by Naz Daud

Raising money from a bank is hard when you are getting started. This is especially the case if you have not raised a large amount of equity, or when you are not investing the money into liquid assets.
Raising business finance can often be one of the most challenging times for an entrepreneur. However, part of entrepreneurialism is perseverance and determination. You have to be prepared for getting knocked down if you want to succeed.

A Silicon Valley entrepreneur was recently quoted as saying he believes an entrepreneur should pitch 30 venture capital firms; they should expect to get 3 offers; and then they should go onto pick the best. This is a grueling process with a 90% failure rate. You should take on board the comments of those that knock you back, but you shouldn’t assume that everyone will feel the same about your idea and your business plan. Entrepreneurialism has lots to do with believing in your idea, but it is also possible that you will have to adapt your business plan to cater for investor appetite, market dynamics or a range of other factors. In many cases, in the vast majority, the business won’t raise a penny. You’ve got to stand out from the crowd. Following are the ways that you could finance your business, and get your entrepreneurial journey off to a start.

Loans

Raising money from a bank is hard when you are getting started. This is especially the case if you have not raised a large amount of equity, or when you are not investing the money into liquid assets. Factors such as the competence of management will also play into how safe the bank would consider the investment. An entrepreneurial company will often consider approaching managements’ family and friends to see if they are able to offer a loan – although there are many downsides to this approach, it’s often one of the only ways to get off the ground for some entrepreneurs.

Sometimes it’s easier to get a loan when your company has a stronger balance sheet through raising equity. Bankers will often talk about the leverage that a business has. This refers to the ratio of equity to loans that your company uses to finance their business. The lower the ratio, the better your creditworthiness, and the more likely a banker will be will be willing to offer a bigger loan at a better interest rate.

When you leverage up your business more, you are likely to be able to increase earnings per share, however you also make your business less stable. Your entrepreneurial mind may be torn between equity dilution, growth and stability. Keep in mind, slow and steady doesn’t always win the raise. Entrepreneurialism is all about accepting a degree of measured risk; you have to decide how far you’re willing to take it in the interest of shareholders.

Equity

It’s sometimes easier to raise equity finance, as a small business, than it is to go to the bank. This is especially the case if you will be investing in intangibles, or an IP-heavy business. Entrepreneurialism tends to be financed by equity investments, more so than loans, for companies that will take longer to reach profitability. Although there are investors who are willing to look at companies in all sectors and at all stages in their growth cycle, you’re more likely to get a favourable valuation if:

• You have a unique idea, a protected idea, or you are likely to benefit from a first movers advantage. Entrepreneurialism, passion and expertise are all extremely important factors too.

• The more progress you have shown, in terms of product development and sales, will always act in your favor. Entrepreneurialism isn’t just about writing business plans; this shows your plan works and you have what it takes.

• Financials are important too. The stronger the balance sheet, the better the cash flow, the more profitable your company is now – the better. However Article Submission, earning potential will play an even bigger role in small investments with good growth potential.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

If you’re looking for a franchising opportunity in the lucrative online advertising industry, consider CityLocal – the UK’s number one business directory. www.citylocal.co.uk & www.citylocal.ie

Making the Most Of Your Franchise Opportunity

Successful franchises develop strong business models that can be replicated in different cities and states. The growth strategy is well-planned and executed for maximum efficiency. Franchise companies gain market share rapidly,and this can help open up subsequent locations as a result. Developing a good franchise system involves some risks, but also finding out some key elements about the market, forecasting revenue accurately, and setting long-term goals.

Making the Most Of Your Franchise Opportunity

This article is written and owned by our Editorial Contributor Tristan Andrews

Getting involved in a franchise business can bring significant rewards and long-term business success with the right plan and strategy. Franchises can penetrate a market, grow rapidly in multiple locations, and adapt to the local market. Franchise systems are nothing new; they date back to medieval times when business were set up to bring tax revenue to the owners. Today’s franchise systems operate under the same manner with royalties and other fees to keep revenue streaming through the owners and franchisee’s hands.

Successful franchises develop strong business models that can be replicated in different cities and states. The growth strategy is well-planned and executed for maximum efficiency. Franchise companies gain market share rapidly, and this can help open up subsequent locations as a result. Developing a good franchise system involves some risks, but also finding out some key elements about the market, forecasting revenue accurately, and setting long-term goals.

Understanding the competition and the market is a great way to learn about market potential, and realistically gauge what type of market penetration can be accomplished over a period of time. Successful franchisors do local research and market analysis, learning about the market’s needs and demands, and adapting their business strategy to meet them effectively.

Successful franchises create a business model that can be adapted regardless of geographic boundaries or restrictive laws. This can mean making sure that costs are controlled and monitored accurately, employment laws are followed, and all state laws and regulations are completely understood well before setting up operations.

Setting up a short-term and long-term growth plan is important for the franchisor, and provides essential information on initial investments, growth potential, and revenue forecasting. Without a growth plan, there is a low chance of success in continuing the business. An accurate assessment of the business model will help generate additional interest and investors as the franchise grows and builds on itself. Growing the franchise at a steady pace will easily drive up the franchise fee over time, and make it an even more attractive business investment for new franchisees. The resale value of the franchise can increase considerably during the growth period, and it’s important to keep this in mind when assessing profitability of a particular business model.

Today’s franchise opportunities include both retail and service businesses, and the successful enterprises take into account the local market, the competition, assessing the business model’s revenue forecast, and creating a growth strategy. All of these areas factor into the long-term success of a franchise, and need to be recognized before a business can grow.

Article Source: http://www.articleviral.com

Tristan Andrews writes useful articles about franchises. Discover and explore the world of Franchising. Find out how owning a franchise can expand your financial horizons at www.franchise-guide.org/

Hot Franchise Opportunity, click here.

Can Culture Change Affect Your Business Results?

It’s easy to talk – what’s rare, however, is recognition of the fact that great leaders explicitly manage the culture of their organization. If you understand this, you will recognize the need to consciously design ‘the way things are around here’, manage it into place and measure, monitor and review it for ever.

Can Culture Change Affect Your Business Results?

This article is written and owned by Kate Mercer

How much time is wasted around your office coffee machine, by people talking about your organization’s culture and its impact on performance? Think about some typical comments:

‘We’re not delivering the results we should’ ‘There’s no leadership around here’ ‘There’s no coherent strategy’
‘We’re not working together as a team’ ‘All we seem to do is fire-fight’ People talk about the results that would be possible if the culture were just right, and they complain where they see people’s attitudes and behavior affecting performance. But if your organization is like most others, the talk masks a kind of resignation – it’s ‘just the way things are around here’.

It’s easy to talk – what’s rare, however, is recognition of the fact that great leaders explicitly manage the culture of their organization. If you understand this, you will recognize the need to consciously design ‘the way things are around here’, manage it into place and measure, monitor and review it for ever. Then you will use all that wasted time and hot air on making your business outstandingly successful, and producing results which are a reflection of a culture which is anything but resigned.

Results are the Outward Expression of Your Organization’s Culture

Every credible organization, like yours, has a set of tangible, measurable, and objective results to produce.
Different kinds of organization will have different kinds of measurable and tangible results, but in business they always include profit and cash.

The state of your organization’s results displays its prevalent culture. We’re not talking just about long-term results; we’re talking about results in every period – including this quarter, this week, today! Where there is a shortfall in results, there is always a shortfall in culture. If you look for the cultural shortfall and resolve it, your required results will be easier to produce.

Take the example of a company who generally managed to reach its quarterly, half-yearly and annual targets, but always only by the skin of its teeth and a frantic last-minute dash to the finish line. Early in every result period, there was a prevailing feeling that ‘there’s plenty of time’, and a disinclination to be held to rigorous forecasts on a daily, weekly and monthly basis. They felt it would be OK, because they had a lot of ideas ‘in the pipeline’, and were confident they could recover later. But the weeks raced by, and suddenly it was ‘that time’ again!
Through rigorous examination of the culture that was driving this stressful pattern, they decided to challenge this behavior and instead to build and develop a culture of, ‘we deliver on our commitments, regardless of the circumstances’. Nowadays they put in place rigorous business forecasts and measure and monitor their progress towards them. More accountability from the start, which can feel like hard work at first, has saved them hundreds of hours of urgent reactive work and untold stress in the panicky ‘will-we, won’t-we’ dash at the end of every year.

How to Quantify the Impact of Culture on Performance

In quantifying the impact of culture on profitability, there are 3 things that matter:

People do things they shouldn’t do People don’t do things they should do People take too long to do things

And there are 2 dimensions of business profitability impact:

Lost opportunity for increased sales Lost opportunity for lower costs

For help with how to quantify this in monetary terms, click here to go to the Shine Website and download our document ‘Quantifying the Effects of Culture Change on Your Business Results’.

Culture Change Hasn’t Happened until Different Results are Produced!

Some groups are very keen to address their cultural issues, and in these groups we sometimes see the same issue from the opposite point of view. People celebrate a wonderful ‘breakthrough’ in culture. Relationships are repaired and teams are built – hooray! Surely, breakthrough results are on the way? Don’t count on it.

Unless your new breakthrough is immediately demonstrated in tangible, measurable, and objective results, it has not been tested and will fade into memory. The time and resources you have spent on the culture change will have been a waste of money. While there might be a new possibility and a lot of excitement, these don’t add up to a new, long-term, sustainable culture. The reality is that the organization’s results still reflect the former culture. If early attempts to alter results are met with resistance in some way, then the work of culture change is not complete, and the enthusiasm for change will be blunted or killed entirely.

So to answer our opening question, not only can culture change affect your business results, it must! Until your key results have changed to reflect your new culture, and you have demonstrated that you can consistently and sustainably deliver the new level of performance, the hard work of changing your organization is not complete!

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At Shine Consulting, we work with leaders who are consciously engaged in designing their organizations to be places where people: are consistently passionate, inspired and committed produce results well beyond the predictable norm In short, organizations that really shine! You can find out more about us and the work we do on our website http://www.shineconsulting.co.uk

The Good And Bad of Franchising

This article is written and owned by CY Tang

The starting point, we believe, for anyone trying to get their head around how and why franchising works, is to read everything you can get your hands on before parting with your life savings! Do not believe what franchisor’s advertisements say. Try to be as unemotional as possible as to what you really want from a franchise relationship. Like most things in life that look simple on the surface, franchising is a complex Pandora’s Box, as often it is not the obvious stuff, you really need to understand.

Let’s start with, why do businesses choose to franchise? The frank answer is they want your money as their franchisee to grow their sales/service distribution system. What type of business can be franchised? Just about anything. So what type of business makes the best franchise system? Well, that’s not easy, but let’s start with the reality that a franchisor is a self appointed leader, and they want you as a team player and dedicated follower to join their marketing system. Yes, you have to commit your hard earnt dollars to join that franchise system and hopefully in doing so you have bouht yourself a good insurance policy! As your start down the part as a small business person, which will not end up in disaster? Yes it is true, technically the franchisor has a strong vested interest in your long term success as one of their franchisees, so you will be safe?

Most people buying a franchise have not been in business before, however they have dreamt about doing so many times and are at a very personal crossroad in their lives, looking for a way to do so, that will minimise their risk. Let’s look at this franchising decision from the franchisor’s point of view, first up. You are the owner of a successful business that is sick of employing people, putting up with fickle interstate agents or perhaps given up trying to find good distributors or commissioned sales people. You are probably also frustrated by having limited capital to grow into more places across Australia, and you are sure type of business, given the opportunity to expand into these perceived new markets, would do very well.

That’s when the idea of franchising enters the scene as maybe; just maybe it could provide the growth answers of both finding and then just as importantly keeping good people, who will invest their hard earned savings, up front to follow your proven marketing/sales way of doing things.

Your biggest problem as a potential franchisee, and frankly it is the same problem for a new franchisor, is making sure both parties understand exactly what this unique commercial relationship will be! We call franchising “The culture of caring”. Why? Because the franchisor needs to care for the financial wellbeing of each and every franchisee they carefully select to be part of their franchise family.

So let us start the process of your understanding of franchising, at the bathroom mirror, for some serious navel gazing. If you are considering buying a franchise, here are some questions for you:

Are you a team player?
Are you passionate about the type of work you would like to do?
Are you in a position emotionally and financially to make a decision within the next couple of months?
How much do you expect to earn in the next year, the year after that etc?
What type of things are you lousy at?
What exactly do you expect the franchisor to do for you?
On a scale of ten, how much of a risk taker are you?
Which job from your past, did you like doing the most?
Do you like the idea of selling?
Where do you see yourself in 10 years time?

Garry Williamson is a popular author in franchise business. His articles appear in lots of local Australian magazines. Visit Online Trading Blog for more of his articles.

Article Source: The Good And Bad of Franchising