Getting A Higher Price When Selling Your Restaurant In 2019

Getting A Higher Price When Selling Your Restaurant In 2019
Chris Viscup a prominent New York Business Broker with Transworld said “One of the other most important parts of selling your restaurant is to make sure your books are in order. It will be your job to prove out how much money trickles down to you through the company and what this can look like to potential buyers.

Getting A Higher Price When Selling Your Restaurant In 2019
by Gary Occhiogrosso Contributor
Photo by Rod Long on Unsplash

It’s 2019 and after years of hard work you’ve now decided to sell your restaurant, perhaps to open a different business, or retire or relocate. Whatever the reason, selling a restaurant requires a strong strategy, careful planning, and detailed preparation. In this article, we’ll explore some essential tips and steps needed to put you on a path for a quicker sale at the highest possible price along with a smooth transition.

Let’s Start With First Impressions.

The appearance of your restaurant not only matters to your customers, but it also matters to potential buyers. Bad “curb appeal” on the initial visit may be all it takes for a potential buyer to take a pass on a more in-depth look into the investment potential of your restaurant. Make sure everything inside and outside the restaurant is clean. If your establishment is a free-standing building, then the quality of care for the property will be an early indication of the level of care taken in building and growing the business over the years. Items like trimming the grass, keeping the parking lot and surrounding area clean and free of trash are crucial to curb appeal. Maintaining clean windows & glass doors, polishing handles, deep cleaning the grout in tile floors and shampooing carpeting are some simple things that will pay dividends to the buyers first impression. If the restaurant is a storefront location, then you’ll also need to make sure any cleaning and improvements that may be the responsibility of the landlord are taken care of before showing the business.

Nothing says “I don’t care” or “I’ve given up on this place” more than broken or missing equipment. If your kitchen equipment is not in 100% working order, it may set up doubt in your financial presentation regarding production capabilities. Also, nonfunctional equipment is detrimental to employee morale and productively. Ultimately that lack of productivity shows up on the Profit and Loss Statement (P&L) in the form of increased labor cost. Every part of the restaurant should present itself as credible to handle the current volume as well as to grow the business in the future. Make sure all of your equipment works. I can not emphasize enough to take the time in advance to replace or repair any broken equipment.

Remove personal items you do not intend to include as part of the sale. Doing this helps avoid any misunderstandings later between buyer and seller. For example, your personal laptop computer used for the business sitting on your desk may be mistaken as part of the assets for sale. Later in this article, we’ll cover making sure a complete equipment and asset list is written. However, the cleaner and less cluttered the visual aspect of the facility, the less chance for any misunderstanding when it comes time to negotiate.

And lastly regarding the facility, don’t be afraid to spend a little TLC money. Making a small investment, such as freshening up the paint, or replacing ceiling tiles, or reupholstering a ripped seat cover can go a long way to increase the visual appeal of your restaurant. These quick fixes will have a positive impact on your sale price and the time it takes to sell the business.

Put Your Financial House In Order Now

Presenting an honest, straightforward, financial picture of your restaurant is the most critical factor in determining accurate valuation and sale price. Professionally documented results regarding unit economics, profitability, and true owner benefit are what buyers, their accountant, and lawyer will be investigating in the due diligence phase of the process. Whether or not potential buyers purchase your restaurant depends on whether or not they think it will make money and provide a reasonable return on investment (ROI). Therefore, the financial information you provide to the buyer is the most significant factor in determining the success of the sale.

Ideally, you have practiced clear and organized bookkeeping since you started your business. If not, then arrange financial records going back at least one year before the time you list your restaurant for sale. That way potential buyers will have a trailing 12-month picture of the restaurant’s performance and trending. It is likely that buyers will ask to see a profit and loss statements and a balance sheet. If you are unable to create them yourself, have your accountant prepare them in advance so you do not feel rushed later in the sale process.

Make A To-Do List For Yourself

Financial statements aren’t the only aspect of getting organized. This step also includes creating a written list of all hard assets such as furniture, fixtures, small wares, and equipment. Also, a copy of your lease should be available for review in the due diligence phase of the transaction. Additionally, be prepared to document that all of the restaurant’s bills are up to date. Be ready to prove in writing that your sales and payroll taxes are current and paid in full. Employee payroll information needs to be in a presentable format and up to date. A to-do list will help you make sure everything gets done so that the sale goes as smoothly as possible.

The Hunt For Buyers

There are two ways to find potential buyers: find them yourself or hire a business broker. The process of valuation, listing, advertising, and vetting potential buyers is time-consuming and in my opinion, requires professional experience and know how. Although many sellers take this step on their own, a professional business broker can support the process by offering recommendations and presentations that save time and attract more potential buyers.

When you interview brokers, be sure to ask them how long they have been in the business of selling businesses, what their specialty is, how many listings they have now, and how many restaurants they have sold in the past year. Also, ask if they have prepared contracts for this type of transaction and how they plan to determine the value of your restaurant. Discuss their answers with your financial and legal advisors to determine if the broker has the right qualifications, experience, and track record.

One prominent New York Business Broker I spoke with said “One of the other most important parts of selling your restaurant is to make sure your books are in order. It will be your job to prove out how much money trickles down to you through the company and what this can look like to potential buyers. Without this component, you will either fall prey to lower offers than you would otherwise be getting, no offers, or end up with buyers wasting your time and never getting to the finish line. Not having good books leads ultimately to the two biggest deal killers – lack of trust and too much time for the transaction to close. With a good broker and good books, most of the heavy lifting is completed in the beginning, before putting the business on the market. Once you sign with a broker, there should be significant time dedicated to proving out the numbers – what they are, and what they could be. Every minute you spend in the beginning will save 5-7 minutes later.”

On the other hand, if you decide to go it alone and forgo hiring a business broker, then you’ll need to get some additional advice from your attorney and account. They can assist you with the proper valuation and selling price. Setting an unrealistic or emotional price on the business will slow the sales process or cause it to fail altogether. Actions to take also includes advertising and listing the restaurant on websites that post restaurants for sale. Keep in mind professional business brokers also use these websites, so competition exists. However, if you study these websites carefully, you should be able to get a good idea on how to word your ad for better results.

Always Be Ready

Whether you list your restaurant on your own or with a broker be prepared to show your restaurant to potential buyers at all times. Since you may have a buyer visit you unannounced, it means keeping the restaurant clean, fully staffed and well-managed no matter the day and time. You never know when a buyer might drop by to take a look. I also remind my clients that any customer in the restaurant may actually be a buyer doing some research before they contact you.

Once The Buyer Is found

At this point, if you’ve found a buyer and negotiations have been successful, then the final step is the paperwork necessary to complete the transaction. The paperwork usually starts with an “Asset Purchase Agreement.” Your attorney should prepare this document for you. The Asset Purchase Agreement details all the components of the sale. Items such as the sale price, the terms (if you are holding a note), a full and complete equipment list, the amount and value of the inventory you will have at the time of closing, the length of time (if any) that you are willing to train the new owner as well as any contingencies regarding the lease assignment from your landlord and of course a deadline date to close the transaction. Regardless of whether you’re working with a business broker or selling on your own, in all cases, I recommend you have your attorney involved to ensure the Asset Purchase Agreement covers all the various aspects of the transaction.

In addition, once you have a buyer engaged but before the final closing date, you should continue to operate your restaurant as if you are not selling it. Acquisitions sometimes fall through at the last minute, and you don’t want to create extra work for yourself in getting everything back up to par again if that happens.

Plan And Proceed

Smart and detailed planning will minimize glitches and deal-killing problems, throughout the transaction. Business Brokers warn: “The biggest disasters all come with one thing in common – wasted time. Without proper planning, not only may you decide to accept an offer lower than what you desire, but you will lose a good portion of your time getting there. As the saying goes – An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure! Make sure you front-load your business and get all the materials you need in order before you sell it.”

I recommend you spend the time upfront, planning the sale, organizing paperwork, investigating brokers and deciding the best time to execute your plan. Selling a restaurant can be a smooth, simple transaction if these tips along with the advice of your accountant and attorney are put into practice.

Branding Drives Restaurant Sales

Create Branding To Drive Restaurant Sales And Growth…

A restaurant must connect with the lifestyle of consumers. The first step to doing this is to have a definite name, image, and brand message.

Create Branding To Drive Restaurant Sales And Growth
By Gary Occhiogrosso
Forbes Contributor
I write about the franchised restaurant and food services industry.

In the past, restaurant advertising consisted mainly of print and broadcast advertisements along with word of mouth. Branding isn’t accomplished solely through conventional advertising. Although advertising uses the branding elements, it refers to so much more. Branding is the practice of making a name, symbol, reasons, and guest experience stand out in the minds of consumers. Branding gives the company and its products a competitive edge above other companies which provide similar products. Thousands of restaurants serve hamburgers, but why when people think about burgers, their minds immediately go to McDonald’s or Burger King? It’s because the power of branding connects the product to a bigger picture. Today’s savvy consumers expect more than merely a place to have a meal. They are not only hungry for lunch but eager to connect with the experience the product or service provides.

Spotlight on branding
In today’s noisy advertising environment restaurants must cut through the clutter with a cohesive advertising and marketing strategy. Franchised and chain restaurant brands spend a great deal of time, effort and dollars on this critical aspect of their business model. Creating and enforcing their brand image is a crucial task for their marketing teams. Smart restaurants marketers understand the need for a consistent brand voice with a clearly defined marketing plan. This consistency is vital because locations in the chain must present consumers with the same image and message to avoid confusion and brand dilution.

Additionally, many consumers want to know what a company stands for, it’s mission, how it goes about its business and why you should eat at a particular restaurant. The need for guest engagement has led restaurant marketers to pivot from purely traditional advertising to creating a total restaurant experience. These experiences include social causes the guests share, their experience with friends and family via social media and their connection to a community. The evolution of social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Yelp, as well as search engine optimization, and online ads have become the new messaging channels used by marketers to increase “occasion to use” and brand loyalty. Today’s chain restaurants employ tactics including traditional advertising, social media messaging and participating in local events that support the community. Creating value and loyalty through brand image and guest experience lives in the mind of the guest long after the meal.

Creating a connection is key

A restaurant must connect with the lifestyle of consumers. The first step to doing this is to have a definite name, image, and brand message. Usually, the owners of the business and a branding team come together to discuss and decide on what the restaurant will mean to their future customers. This step should be accomplished at the beginning of the business planning.

Jennifer Williams, the founding partner, of “the watsons,” a New York City based branding firm, describes the importance of restaurant branding like this: ” The National Restaurant Association reports that Americans spend $799 billion a year on restaurants. Beyond clothing, restaurants are the most searched type of business online. Competition is fierce, and branding is more important than ever before. Whether yours is a franchise or independent restaurant, it takes more than great food and service to lure customers and build loyalty and repeat business. It takes a well-defined brand that resonates emotionally with your customers. A brand is essentially the personality of your business. Moreover, its value is derived from the connection people make with it. In today’s crowded restaurant sector, where many chain restaurants offer similar menus, your ability to differentiate yourself – can make or break your success.

READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE HERE https://www.forbes.com/sites/garyocchiogrosso/2018/11/14/create-branding-to-drive-restaurant-sales-and-growth/#537d8cd3487a

The Success of Acai Express – Now a Franchise in the USA.

“We provide a system that is simple to operate with no experience needed.” Our Acai Berries are harvested from the Amazon Rainforest. This discourages deforestation while at the same time creating financial opportunities for local farmers. We are committed to a culture of appreciation to our guests, franchisees, and team members.’
– Hector Westerband, Founder, and CEO – Acai Express

Watch The Founder of Acai Express explain the reasons why Acai Express is a hit.
https://lnkd.in/dhearqw

The Success of Acai Express – Now a Franchise in the USA.

Our story starts with crashing waves and bustling street corners. In July 2013, Hector Westerband, an avid surfer, founded Acai Express in his homeland of Puerto Rico. Beginning with a single food truck in Guaynabo, Hector wanted to promote a healthy lifestyle centered on the nutrient-rich acai berry. The rapid popularity of his food truck meant he quickly expanded the brand to open franchises elsewhere on the island (13 locations in Puerto Rico as of 2018…)

At Acai Express our mission is to provide our customers the best experience with the highest quality products. We strive to promote a healthy existence by offering customers a lifestyle brand with products that benefit our minds, our bodies, and our souls. Our products are created with the active and health-conscious consumer in mind creating a socially responsible business model.

Our Acai Berries are harvested from the Amazon Rainforest. This discourages deforestation while at the same time creating financial opportunities for local farmers. We are committed to a culture of appreciation to our guests, franchisees, and team members.

As an Acai Express franchisee you will benefit from distinct competitive advantages. We provide an innovative marketing program with a unique and lively shop design. Our menu offers 100% organic “Grade A” acai with other high-quality products and has all day sales potential. With three flexible business models, we provide a system that is simple to operate with no experience needed. Our franchise model offers a low-cost entry, with protected territories, comprehensive training, and an experienced management team.

For franchise information please contact:[email protected]
Notice Regarding Franchise Offers and Sales

This information is not intended as an offer to sell, or the solicitation of an offer to buy, a franchise. It is for information purposes only. There are approximately 14 countries and 15 US states that regulate the offer and sale of franchises. The countries are Australia, Brazil, Belgium, Canada (provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Ontario and Prince Edward Island), China, France, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Russia, South Korea, Spain, and the United States of America. The US states are California, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. If you are a resident of one of these states or countries, are receiving this message in one of these states or countries, or intend to operate a franchise in any of these states or countries, we will not offer you a franchise unless and until we have complied with any applicable pre-sale registration and/or disclosure requirements in the applicable jurisdiction.
This offering is not an offering of a franchise. In New York (USA), an offering of a franchise can only be made by a prospectus that has been previously filed and registered with the Department of Law of the State of New York. The application for registration of an offering prospectus or the acceptance and filing thereof by the Department of Law as required by the New York law does not constitute approval of the offering or the sale of such franchise by the Department of Law or the attorney general of New York.
© 2017 Harold L. Kestenbaum, Esq.

2nd edition in our “Coach, Mentor & Grow®” video series for Franchisors

Here’s the 2nd edition in our “Coach, Mentor & Grow®” video series for Franchisors. The panel at the NY FBN/IFA meeting covered the topic of “Franchising and Private Equity- How to Position your Company” Panelist Oz Bengur, Lisa Oak, Grant Marcks and Roger Lipton. Hosted by David Azrin Esq.

If you’d like to receive the entire 1-hour session please contact us at [email protected]

Watch the video: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gary-occhiogrosso/detail/recent-activity/shares/

Why Franchisees Go “Rogue” and What to Do About It

Among the best ways to keep franchisees from changing or competing with your brand is to have an ever-evolving brand that creates financial opportunity for the franchisee. Another great technique is to set up “Franchise Advisory Council” so franchisees are made to feel that their opinions, input and feedback matters to the success of not only their individual unit but also the brand as a whole.

Why Franchisees Go “Rogue” and What to Do About It How to prevent a problem from occurring in the first place.
By Gary Occhiogrosso – Managing Partner, Franchise Growth Solutions, LLC.

One of the problems facing franchisors is when franchisees choose to go “rogue” by changing how they run the system or they take proprietary knowledge to compete with the brand. There are famous cases where slight changes to a name, but similar advertising and business models landed franchisees in court. One that stands out is Mister Softee, Inc. vs. Tsirkos in 2014. The franchisee copied the ice cream brand’s trucks and even operated under the name Master Softee. Needless to say the “real” Mr. Softee won out in that case. However, time, energy and money were spent on something that may have been avoided in the first. Why do franchisees make these decisions? Sometime its just in their nature or personality to take a position of “knowing better or more” than the franchisor. Although many times it’s because the franchisor is not living up to the franchisee’s expectations or worse yet, offing little in the way of field support, innovation and/or ongoing education designed to help the franchisee drive sales into their establishment. As a result a franchisee may sometimes feel abandoned and then goes into “Survival Mode”.

Ways to Keep Franchisees from Competing with Franchisors

Among the best ways to keep franchisees from changing or competing with your brand is to have an ever-evolving brand that creates financial opportunity for the franchisee. Another great technique is to set up Franchise Advisory Council so franchisees are made to feel that their opinions, input and feedback matters to the success of not only their individual unit but also the brand as a whole.

Of course how the franchisor communicates with its franchisees is a key component to success. It’s not enough to issue reports and statements concerning policy changes and procedural updates. You’ve got to meet face-to-face and make the franchisees part of the discussion. Field visits are integral in developing strong report with the individual franchise owner. An open, transparent approach to issues facing franchisee can make all the difference in the world. This approach will surely help when a franchisee is contemplating reinventing the wheel or leaving the system all together.
When issues of operational compliance do come into play (and they will eventually) you’ll need to demonstrate why following the system is the way to success. Franchisors should be confident they are making legitimate requests of the franchisee by making sure all the franchisor’s processes have been fully tested and proven to be successful. If this is the case, then in my experience, even the most difficult franchisees will have reason to follow suit although they may be reluctant to do so at first. It’s also import to keep an open mind and listen to the franchisee. When franchisees feel they are “heard” they are far less likely to go rogue. Critiquing does a lot but encouragement does a lot more. Creating a culture of open communication will go miles in preventing rogue franchisees.

What Protections are in Place for Franchisors?
Spending time to coach, counsel, correct and encourage franchisees does not mean the franchisor should ever give up their rights and remedies under their franchise agreement. And when a rouge franchisee is damaging the brand or the system or both and if a resolution cannot be reached then unfortunately the only choice is to terminate the relationship. Your franchise agreement should clearly state the terms and conditions for termination. That said, following one basic principle of communication and transparency should prevent this from happening. However if a franchisee does go rogue, then swift and decisive action must be taken to protect your intellectual property and your other franchisees.
Avoiding rogue franchisees requires skill, work and constant improvement on the part of the franchisor. The lines of communication between franchisors and franchisees must remain open and clear. Setting expectations early in the approval process and onboarding is key. Expectations must be spelled out clearly from the beginning. All these small steps, when combined and practiced regularly will help to prevent rogue franchisees.
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About the Author:
Gary Occhiogrosso is the Managing Partner of Franchise Growth Solutions, which is a co-operative based franchise development and sales firm.
Their “Coach, Mentor & Grow Program” focuses on helping Franchisors with their franchise development, strategic planning, advertising, selling franchises and guiding franchisors in raising growth capital.
Gary started his career in franchising as a franchisee of Dunkin Donuts before launching the Ranch *1 Franchise program with it’s founders. He is the former President of TRUFOODS, LLC a 100+ unit, multi brand franchisor and former COO of Desert Moon Fresh Mexican Grille. He advises several emerging and growth brands in the franchise industry
Gary was selected as “Top 25 Fast Casual Restaurant Executive in the USA” by Fast Casual Magazine and named “Top 50 CXO’s” by SmartCEO Magazine. In addition Gary is an adjunct instructor at New York University on the topics of Restaurant Concept & Business Development as well Entrepreneurship. He has published numerous articles on the topics of Franchising, Entrepreneurship, Sales and Marketing. He is also the host of the “Small Business & Franchise Show” broadcast over AM970 in New York City and the founder of FranchiseMoneyMaker.com

Getting New Franchisees Off to a Great Start

This approach helps franchisees adapt as the brand grows and systems evolve. Preparing franchisees to deal with the issues that may come up along the way is key to building a successful franchise system. Ultimately solid onboarding and training should expose the franchisee to detailed information so the franchisee knows what the company expects and they can live up to the “Brand Mission”.

Getting New Franchisees Off to a Great Start
Prepare them for business ownership through the onboarding and training process.

By Gary Occhiogrosso – Managing Partner of Franchise Growth Solutions, LLC.

When training new franchisees, there is a term that is used regularly but has received a lot of criticism “Onboarding” Many Franchisors believe that the “onboarding process” begins once a candidate is awarded the franchise. I coach this process is a different way. At Franchise Growth Solutions we know that the onboarding process begins from the very first interaction the company has with the franchise prospect.

That said, let’s take a step back and first explore the goal of proper onboarding. In my opinion, the main focus is to create value for the brand in the minds eye of the candidate. Without value and respect for the brand, all the training in the world will not produce a franchisee capable of living up to his or her full potential as the operating franchisee.

Although franchisee training is often seen as a means to an end because of how quick paced it is and how much information is packed into training sessions, in and of itself training is certainly not the sole answer in producing quality franchisees. Through the years I’ve trained franchisors to understand that in order to successfully orientate a new franchisee; Mission, Culture and Core Values of the brand must be communicated to and embraced by the franchisee. Here again I cannot emphasize enough that franchisors must start building value and respect for the brand during the recruitment phase. It is during that time, potential franchisees and the franchisor should engage in meaningful, mindful conversation so that the franchise candidate understands what is expected of them and the Franchisor should understand what the franchisee expects in return. It’s a simple (but not easy) process that can lead to rejecting a candidate and losing the deal. However, trust me when I say, losing that candidate is a far better outcome than bringing the wrong franchisee into the system only to wreak havoc, compromise brand standards and lobby additional, otherwise satisfied franchisees into their negative mindset.

Successful onboarding and training requires transparency, consistency and follow up.

The likelihood of a franchise owner “going rogue” when a company is transparent in its expectations lessens. Franchisees know what is expected of them. In addition, the Franchisor’s support personnel should be out in the field in front of the franchise owner, coaching, counseling and working with the franchisee to achieve optimum results, financially as well as making sure the business is providing options consistent with the franchisees lifestyle goals. Supplying ongoing training that places resources within reach of the franchisee is not only vital at the onboarding phase but throughout the lifecycle of the business relationship. This approach helps franchisees adapt as the brand grows and systems evolve. Preparing franchisees to deal with the issues that may come up along the way is key to building a successful franchise system. Ultimately solid onboarding and training should expose the franchisee to detailed information so the franchisee knows what the company expects and they can live up to the “Brand Mission”. Initial and ongoing training should support the idea that following the system is the most important aspect leading to the success of the business. This approach puts franchisees in a better position to make sound decisions concerning the business with little outside assistance and with little room to “reinvent the wheel”.

Franchisees need to be held accountable for holding the same high standards as the franchisor. In order to do this, your company culture, value proposition, training program, operations manuals, job aids and other franchisor supplied tools should be carefully developed, tested, reviewed and updated as necessary. The onboarding process and training program is never “done”. As the franchisor it is your job to insure that franchisees have access to the tools and support needed to grow and thrive.
Get new franchisees off to a great start through a sound onboarding process that starts at the first hello. Recruit and vet your candidates thoroughly, be certain they are a fit for you brand culture and buy into your mission statement. Provide them with the tools and support needed to navigate system changes as they occur. Give the franchisees the foundation they need to grow, develop, and succeed as business owners. An excellent franchise system, built this way from the start makes it easier for franchisees to overcome challenging situations as they occur, and they will occur.
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About the Author:

Gary Occhiogrosso is the Managing Partner of Franchise Growth Solutions, which is a co-operative based franchise development and sales firm. http://www.frangrow.com

Their “Coach, Mentor & Grow Program” focuses on helping Franchisors with their franchise development, strategic planning, advertising, selling franchises and guiding franchisors in raising growth capital.

Gary started his career in franchising as a franchisee of Dunkin Donuts before launching the Ranch *1 Franchise program with it’s founders. He is the former President of TRUFOODS, LLC a 100+ unit, multi brand franchisor and former COO of Desert Moon Fresh Mexican Grille. He advises several emerging and growth brands in the franchise industry.

Gary was selected as “Top 25 Fast Casual Restaurant Executive in the USA” by Fast Casual Magazine and named “Top 50 CXO’s” by SmartCEO Magazine. In addition Gary is an adjunct instructor at New York University teaching Restaurant Concept & Business Development as well Entrepreneurship. He has published numerous articles on the topics of Franchising, Entrepreneurship, Sales and Marketing. He is also the host of the “Small Business & Franchise Show” broadcast over AM970 in New York City and the founder of http://www.FranchiseMoneyMaker.com

Acai Express – A simple franchise concept with a track record of success

Acai Express – A simple franchise concept with a track record of success…Acai Express – Growing through our mission of providing fresh 100% “Grade A” Acai that we directly import from Brazil…Acai Express – A franchise for everyone

Pink Dragon Bowl

Mira lo rico que se ve al preparar un Delicioso #PinkDragonBowl de Acai Express. La combinación perfecta de pitahaya con tus frutas favoritas, granola y miel!!!

Posted by Acai Express Superfood Bowls on Tuesday, May 2, 2017

By Hector Westerband
Founder Acia Express

Watch the video and call 917 991 2465
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nO4zKCn0qOU#action=share

Acai Express is not just another business selling healthy concoctions. Instead, we are a lifestyle.
Our mission is to promote a healthy existence by serving up a lifestyle brand of body beneficial goodness. Our lifestyle-based acai bowls are created for the active and health conscious in mind. On our menu you will find the “Surfer Bowl” for our fellow surfers, the “Yogi Bowl” for our beloved yogis and the Wolfpack Bowl” named after a Jiu-Jitsu school in Puerto Rico.

Whether it’s just deciding to eat better and exercise or engage in fun and natural activities, Acai Express would like to take this journey with you.

With all fresh fruits and mostly organic products, our acai bowls, pitaya bowls, smoothies and natural juices are sure to impress all of those with healthy souls and curious hearts.

When and where was Acai Express founded?

Acai Express was founded by Hector Westerband in July of 2013. An avid surfer in his homeland of Puerto Rico, Hector set out to bring the healthy living lifestyle, formed around the powerful and nutrient-rich acai berry, to everyone on the island. With the success of his first food truck in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, Hector saw the tremendous growth potential and soon thereafter expanded his brand to offer franchise opportunities.

Now Acai Express is venturing into the USA market, to continue to promote this healthy way of life and provide quick service nutrient-rich food alternatives to those seeking a healthy and active lifestyle.

What exactly is Acai?
If you’re wondering what exactly an acai berry is, imagine a cross between the coloring and size of a grape and a blueberry. Acai is a small and seeded, reddish-purple berry. These berries are harvested from 70-foot tall palm trees located near South America’s Amazon River.

Many fruits have high sugar content and acidity which provides some protection against oxidizing and turning brown. However, the acai berry’s low sugar and low acid levels speeds up the oxidization process thereby losing their nutritional benefits more quickly. So, to maintain the nutritional value and to prohibit them from being oxidized, once the berries are picked and processed, they are flash-pasteurized and then promptly frozen for transport. Noted as being beneficial for health, these little berries pack a punch of powerful antioxidants, fiber, monounsaturated fats, iron, calcium, vitamin A and anthocyanins.

If you’d like to know more contact us at [email protected] or call 917 991 2465

So You Want to Franchise Your Business?

It is imperative that you develop awareness around your brand to differentiate your business from your competitors. Keep in mind that a strong franchise will emerge from a brand that has gained considerable recognition in the marketplace. This way, even if other businesses produce similar services or products, your brand will set you apart.

Franchise Sign Map New Business Opportunity 3d Illustration

You Want to Franchise Your Business?
By Harold Kestenbaum

You might consider franchising your business once you notice an increase in performance, sales, and realize you have become a distinguished brand within a competitive market. A franchise is a great way to expand your small business, however, you must understand that it takes time.

Remember, you will need to consider changes to your business model, how you handle and measure consumer satisfaction, and how you tabulate revenue. Therefore, if you are new to franchising, you might want to consider our premium legal services before you venture into this business model. Once you have decided that franchising is the way to go, consider these factors:

Product or Service Superiority
A thriving franchise begins with a superior service or product. Therefore, your service or product should attract prospective franchisees in addition to attracting consumers. Demonstrating your business’s credibility and profitability will be particularly vital to acquire franchisees.

First, consider the success of your service or product, and establish whether it’s been proven over time. If it has, your business might work as an excellent prototype for franchisees. Keep in mind, however, that a franchise operation should be more lucrative than a regular business because franchisees will need to pay an initial fee initially and royalties while earning sufficient income for themselves.

Strong franchises frequently strike a balance between wide appeal and originality. Most consumers will recommend a familiar service or merchandise with a dimension that makes it distinct in the marketplace, such as a unique patented technology.

Brand Distinction
It is imperative that you develop awareness around your brand to differentiate your business from your competitors. Keep in mind that a strong franchise will emerge from a brand that has gained considerable recognition in the marketplace. This way, even if other businesses produce similar services or products, your brand will set you apart. It is also important that you protect your intellectual property using a trademark that will protect your brand’s distinctive features.

Your Customer
When franchising, your focus will shift from serving the end consumer to the entrepreneurs who are buying your franchised business. You will need to concentrate more on optimizing the infrastructure for other individuals’ businesses and less time on working with those purchasing your product. This is a huge transition for any company but particularly founders who are accustomed to collaborating directly with their clients or customers.

Shareable and Teachable Concept
Once you have decided that your service or product is distinct and profitable, you must consider whether you can teach franchisees and their employees about the concept in a comparatively short period of time. Although some businesses are lucrative, they may depend on the owner’s continuous involvement to remain successful.

If this is so, make your business franchise-ready by hiring workers and training them in your techniques. Make sure you can explain the concept to other people in a way they can grasp and consistently replicate.

Most businesses can do this, but you must put the process down on paper. Eventually, you can solidify the prerequisites with training manuals, training programs, and handbooks for every level of your franchise operation.

Necessary Skills
Although you are capable of operating your business, running a franchise can be demanding. Once you franchise, your business will expand along with your responsibilities, as will your team’s. You will need good communication and organizational skills, which will enable you to sustain a solid team work ethic and a stronger organization. Remember, being a franchisor is a separate business from the single unit that you have been operating on a day to day basis. Your focus becomes expanding the franchise system and not operating your single location.

If you’ve seen tremendous business growth, you might be thinking of franchising. But before you do it’s important you evaluate these factors before making any decisions. If you’re new to franchising, for instance, the model might seem overwhelming. Fortunately, you’ll find the advice and information you need from Harold Kestenbaum, so don’t hesitate to contact us at:http://franchiseatty.com/about/

HOW FRANCHISING IMPACTS THE ECONOMY AND CREATES JOBS

According to the International Franchise Association (IFA), 2016 helped U.S. employment rates by growing 3.5 percent. The projected totals for 2017 estimated continuous growth with the addition of close to 250,000 new jobs. Franchise output was also up in 2016 by a reported 5.8%.

HOW FRANCHISING IMPACTS THE ECONOMY AND CREATES JOBS
By Gary Occhiogrosso, Managing Partner – Franchise Growth Solutions, LLC.


Franchisees support communities by strengthening them financially.

In cities around the nation, franchises play an integral role in supporting the local economy through job creation and the payment of taxes. In Jacksonville, Florida, Checkers franchisees Karen and Rich Weber have turned around a franchise that failed not once with former owners but four times previously in the city. Thanks to their knowledge of the restaurant industry and franchise training, the couple has survived to see the opening of their second location in the city.

Their reputation for building customer relationships has helped them create growth within their franchise. Previous owners were not able to keep up with customer demand nor were they able to offer the same type of benefits to the local economy the Webers have. With the opening of a second Checkers in the city, there is a need for even more skilled employees to fill the roles in the business.

New Businesses Help Other Local Businesses Thrive

Men and women are more likely to shop locally when they have a reason to come into town in the first place. The excitement of a new franchise spreads like wildfire, helping other business owners meet sales goals. In return, these businesses pay more taxes due to increased sales which support the city’s budget for the year.

Employment Rates Steadily Increase Yearly Because of Franchises

According to the International Franchise Association (IFA), 2016 helped U.S. employment rates by growing 3.5 percent. The projected totals for 2017 estimated continuous growth with the addition of close to 250,000 new jobs. Franchise output was also up in 2016 by a reported 5.8%.

Franchises Earn Billions of Dollars Annually

Estimates for 2017 had franchises earning an outstanding $700 billion. Americans then contribute dollars to the local economy through payroll and taxes. Having the option to become a franchisee opposed to starting a business from the ground up is very appealing to entrepreneurs who see growth projections for franchises on the incline each year.

Take Your Great Franchise Idea and Help Communities Nationwide

Franchisors contribute a great deal of resources to communities around the globe. Launching a successful franchise business provides entrepreneurs with the opportunity to share their ideas, products, and services with like-minded business people who find franchising to be a legitimate way to go into business for themselves. The local economy thrives, jobs are created, and local business districts in cities around the globe profit.

For information on starting your own francise business contact: [email protected] or visit www.frangrow.com
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About the Author:
Gary Occhiogrosso is the Managing Partner of Franchise Growth Solutions, which is a co-operative based franchise development and sales firm.
Their “Coach, Mentor & Grow Program” focuses on helping Franchisors with their franchise development, strategic planning, advertising, selling franchises and guiding franchisors in raising growth capital.

Gary started his career in franchising as a franchisee of Dunkin Donuts before launching the Ranch *1 Franchise program with it’s founders. He is the former President of TRUFOODS, LLC a 100+ unit, multi brand franchisor and former COO of Desert Moon Fresh Mexican Grille. He advises several emerging and growth brands in the franchise industry

Gary was selected as “Top 25 Fast Casual Restaurant Executive in the USA” by Fast Casual Magazine and named “Top 50 CXO’s” by SmartCEO Magazine. In addition Gary is an adjunct instructor at New York University on the topics of Restaurant Concept & Business Development as well Entrepreneurship. He has published numerous articles on the topics of Franchising, Entrepreneurship, Sales and Marketing. He is also the host of the “Small Business & Franchise Show” broadcast over AM970 in New York City and the founder of FranchiseMoneyMaker.com

Franchisee Education – Why do I Pay a Franchise Fee?

To the Franchisee it must represent a reasonable fee to allow you to become a part of the existing system, including all of the training programs that are a part of that system, to help you reach your own business goals.

Why do I Pay a Franchise Fee?
By Premium Author Dennis Schooley

Franchising is a strategy that the Franchisor uses to achieve its objectives, including market penetration and market domination. Franchises are granted or awarded to a qualifying Franchise Candidate that has similar objectives in their own marketplace. That Franchisee will have the responsibility to fully implement the operating and marketing systems of the Franchisor in their defined area for a specified period of time. The relationship is not generally one of parity.

If it were a relationship of parity, the Franchisee would take on a great deal more responsibility, and of course, liability and risk as well. So the relationship is not one of actual partnership in the legal sense. However, good Franchise systems will generally recognize their Franchisees as Strategic-Partners, meaning they are in a partnership of sorts that is aimed at achieving unified goals, but not one of legal partnership or equity.

The Franchise Fee is the cost of putting the Franchisee into the business of the Franchisor, not as a partner, but as a participant. Costs include:

The development costs of all of the elements of the Franchisor’s system

Training the individual Franchisee to use those system elements and programs
Marketing and advertising to find Candidates
Costs of qualifying Candidates including rejecting many unqualified Candidates
Salaries, travel, & administration, etc.
Legal expenses to draft agreements defining the methods & terms for the Franchisee to participate
The Franchise Fee is the Franchisor’s assessment to cover those costs as well as a reasonable markup. In other words, it’s the entry fee to the point of the completion of the initial training programs.

To the Franchisee it must represent a reasonable fee to allow you to become a part of the existing system, including all of the training programs that are a part of that system, to help you reach your own business goals.

When asked about the Franchise Fee, the Franchisor should have this concept clearly defined in their approach to Franchising. They should recognize that the Franchise Fee should be reflective of the value of entry into a well-developed, comprehensive system for the participant Franchisee. They should also recognize it as the recovery of costs to find, qualifyPsychology Articles, and grant legal rights to participate in that system to the very best Franchisees for the Franchisor’s business.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com