Getting A Higher Price When Selling Your Restaurant In 2019

Getting A Higher Price When Selling Your Restaurant In 2019
Chris Viscup a prominent New York Business Broker with Transworld said “One of the other most important parts of selling your restaurant is to make sure your books are in order. It will be your job to prove out how much money trickles down to you through the company and what this can look like to potential buyers.

Getting A Higher Price When Selling Your Restaurant In 2019
by Gary Occhiogrosso Contributor
Photo by Rod Long on Unsplash

It’s 2019 and after years of hard work you’ve now decided to sell your restaurant, perhaps to open a different business, or retire or relocate. Whatever the reason, selling a restaurant requires a strong strategy, careful planning, and detailed preparation. In this article, we’ll explore some essential tips and steps needed to put you on a path for a quicker sale at the highest possible price along with a smooth transition.

Let’s Start With First Impressions.

The appearance of your restaurant not only matters to your customers, but it also matters to potential buyers. Bad “curb appeal” on the initial visit may be all it takes for a potential buyer to take a pass on a more in-depth look into the investment potential of your restaurant. Make sure everything inside and outside the restaurant is clean. If your establishment is a free-standing building, then the quality of care for the property will be an early indication of the level of care taken in building and growing the business over the years. Items like trimming the grass, keeping the parking lot and surrounding area clean and free of trash are crucial to curb appeal. Maintaining clean windows & glass doors, polishing handles, deep cleaning the grout in tile floors and shampooing carpeting are some simple things that will pay dividends to the buyers first impression. If the restaurant is a storefront location, then you’ll also need to make sure any cleaning and improvements that may be the responsibility of the landlord are taken care of before showing the business.

Nothing says “I don’t care” or “I’ve given up on this place” more than broken or missing equipment. If your kitchen equipment is not in 100% working order, it may set up doubt in your financial presentation regarding production capabilities. Also, nonfunctional equipment is detrimental to employee morale and productively. Ultimately that lack of productivity shows up on the Profit and Loss Statement (P&L) in the form of increased labor cost. Every part of the restaurant should present itself as credible to handle the current volume as well as to grow the business in the future. Make sure all of your equipment works. I can not emphasize enough to take the time in advance to replace or repair any broken equipment.

Remove personal items you do not intend to include as part of the sale. Doing this helps avoid any misunderstandings later between buyer and seller. For example, your personal laptop computer used for the business sitting on your desk may be mistaken as part of the assets for sale. Later in this article, we’ll cover making sure a complete equipment and asset list is written. However, the cleaner and less cluttered the visual aspect of the facility, the less chance for any misunderstanding when it comes time to negotiate.

And lastly regarding the facility, don’t be afraid to spend a little TLC money. Making a small investment, such as freshening up the paint, or replacing ceiling tiles, or reupholstering a ripped seat cover can go a long way to increase the visual appeal of your restaurant. These quick fixes will have a positive impact on your sale price and the time it takes to sell the business.

Put Your Financial House In Order Now

Presenting an honest, straightforward, financial picture of your restaurant is the most critical factor in determining accurate valuation and sale price. Professionally documented results regarding unit economics, profitability, and true owner benefit are what buyers, their accountant, and lawyer will be investigating in the due diligence phase of the process. Whether or not potential buyers purchase your restaurant depends on whether or not they think it will make money and provide a reasonable return on investment (ROI). Therefore, the financial information you provide to the buyer is the most significant factor in determining the success of the sale.

Ideally, you have practiced clear and organized bookkeeping since you started your business. If not, then arrange financial records going back at least one year before the time you list your restaurant for sale. That way potential buyers will have a trailing 12-month picture of the restaurant’s performance and trending. It is likely that buyers will ask to see a profit and loss statements and a balance sheet. If you are unable to create them yourself, have your accountant prepare them in advance so you do not feel rushed later in the sale process.

Make A To-Do List For Yourself

Financial statements aren’t the only aspect of getting organized. This step also includes creating a written list of all hard assets such as furniture, fixtures, small wares, and equipment. Also, a copy of your lease should be available for review in the due diligence phase of the transaction. Additionally, be prepared to document that all of the restaurant’s bills are up to date. Be ready to prove in writing that your sales and payroll taxes are current and paid in full. Employee payroll information needs to be in a presentable format and up to date. A to-do list will help you make sure everything gets done so that the sale goes as smoothly as possible.

The Hunt For Buyers

There are two ways to find potential buyers: find them yourself or hire a business broker. The process of valuation, listing, advertising, and vetting potential buyers is time-consuming and in my opinion, requires professional experience and know how. Although many sellers take this step on their own, a professional business broker can support the process by offering recommendations and presentations that save time and attract more potential buyers.

When you interview brokers, be sure to ask them how long they have been in the business of selling businesses, what their specialty is, how many listings they have now, and how many restaurants they have sold in the past year. Also, ask if they have prepared contracts for this type of transaction and how they plan to determine the value of your restaurant. Discuss their answers with your financial and legal advisors to determine if the broker has the right qualifications, experience, and track record.

One prominent New York Business Broker I spoke with said “One of the other most important parts of selling your restaurant is to make sure your books are in order. It will be your job to prove out how much money trickles down to you through the company and what this can look like to potential buyers. Without this component, you will either fall prey to lower offers than you would otherwise be getting, no offers, or end up with buyers wasting your time and never getting to the finish line. Not having good books leads ultimately to the two biggest deal killers – lack of trust and too much time for the transaction to close. With a good broker and good books, most of the heavy lifting is completed in the beginning, before putting the business on the market. Once you sign with a broker, there should be significant time dedicated to proving out the numbers – what they are, and what they could be. Every minute you spend in the beginning will save 5-7 minutes later.”

On the other hand, if you decide to go it alone and forgo hiring a business broker, then you’ll need to get some additional advice from your attorney and account. They can assist you with the proper valuation and selling price. Setting an unrealistic or emotional price on the business will slow the sales process or cause it to fail altogether. Actions to take also includes advertising and listing the restaurant on websites that post restaurants for sale. Keep in mind professional business brokers also use these websites, so competition exists. However, if you study these websites carefully, you should be able to get a good idea on how to word your ad for better results.

Always Be Ready

Whether you list your restaurant on your own or with a broker be prepared to show your restaurant to potential buyers at all times. Since you may have a buyer visit you unannounced, it means keeping the restaurant clean, fully staffed and well-managed no matter the day and time. You never know when a buyer might drop by to take a look. I also remind my clients that any customer in the restaurant may actually be a buyer doing some research before they contact you.

Once The Buyer Is found

At this point, if you’ve found a buyer and negotiations have been successful, then the final step is the paperwork necessary to complete the transaction. The paperwork usually starts with an “Asset Purchase Agreement.” Your attorney should prepare this document for you. The Asset Purchase Agreement details all the components of the sale. Items such as the sale price, the terms (if you are holding a note), a full and complete equipment list, the amount and value of the inventory you will have at the time of closing, the length of time (if any) that you are willing to train the new owner as well as any contingencies regarding the lease assignment from your landlord and of course a deadline date to close the transaction. Regardless of whether you’re working with a business broker or selling on your own, in all cases, I recommend you have your attorney involved to ensure the Asset Purchase Agreement covers all the various aspects of the transaction.

In addition, once you have a buyer engaged but before the final closing date, you should continue to operate your restaurant as if you are not selling it. Acquisitions sometimes fall through at the last minute, and you don’t want to create extra work for yourself in getting everything back up to par again if that happens.

Plan And Proceed

Smart and detailed planning will minimize glitches and deal-killing problems, throughout the transaction. Business Brokers warn: “The biggest disasters all come with one thing in common – wasted time. Without proper planning, not only may you decide to accept an offer lower than what you desire, but you will lose a good portion of your time getting there. As the saying goes – An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure! Make sure you front-load your business and get all the materials you need in order before you sell it.”

I recommend you spend the time upfront, planning the sale, organizing paperwork, investigating brokers and deciding the best time to execute your plan. Selling a restaurant can be a smooth, simple transaction if these tips along with the advice of your accountant and attorney are put into practice.

Six Ways to Finance a Restaurant Franchise

Six Ways to Finance a Restaurant Food Franchise…

Before seeking financing of any kind, make sure you’ve done your own due diligence. Prior to beginning your search, it’s important to know your own net worth, your credit rating, and to have a comprehensive business plan that includes pro forma documents, operations details and market comparison analysis.

Six Ways to Finance a Restaurant Food Franchise

If you are considering investing in a franchise opportunity, the very first question that may come to mind is whether you qualify financially. Most entrepreneurs, restaurant aficionados, or business executives exploring opportunities for a restaurant food franchise will seek outside sources of financing. The golden rule is to expect to contribute 15% to 30% of your own money to start with, and then go from there.

If 30% seems daunting, there’s good news. Often a franchise business opportunity is looked upon by financial institutions as less of a risk, compared to independent business start-ups. This can be further reinforced by the history and recognition of the brand name, the number of units in operation, and even the support provided to the franchisee by the franchisor.

Before seeking financing of any kind, make sure you’ve done your own due diligence. Prior to beginning your search, it’s important to know your own net worth, your credit rating, and to have a comprehensive business plan that includes pro forma documents, operations details and market comparison analysis.

Franchise financing can be complex, but it doesn’t have to feel impossible. Consider these six ways to finance a restaurant food franchise like Taboonette.

1. Friends and family, as well as experienced business owners,d business owners turn inwardly toward friends and relatives to help finance their franchise or start-up business. With this kind of financing, individuals and families get to create their own terms for repayment and enjoy the collaborative support from those closest to them.

2.SBA loans.
The Small Business Administration is a government agency that helps entrepreneurs plan, launch, manage and grow their businesses.1 They work with financial institutions to provide SBA-secured loans. A lender may be more likely to approve financing for individuals backed by an SBA loan because it is 90% secured. This means if the loan goes into default, the SBA guarantees repayment of 90% of the loan to the lending institution.

3.Bank and private loans.
Since the 2008 recession, it has been more difficult to secure bank loans or loans from venture capitalists or angel investors. A bank loan not secured by the SBA is perhaps the most challenging to obtain, but if you have a good relationship with a financial institution, a stellar credit rating and the required minimum liquid capital, it may be a good option.

4.Veterans loan.
The Department of Veterans Affairs, another government institution, offers qualified veterans financing opportunities for franchise and business loans. The program, called the Patriot Express because of its speedy process, makes loans up to $500,000 to active-duty military preparing to transition to civilian life, as well as to spouses and survivors of veterans. The loans come with the SBA’s lowest rates.2

5.Home equity.
A home equity line of credit or second mortgage is a way of obtaining financing but comes with a personal risk. Financing in this way uses your home as security. This means if you default on a business loan, you lose your home. But with sufficient equity in your home, it can be a relatively easy financing source to tap.

6.401(k), stocks and other personal accounts.
It is not unusual for people to tap into their retirement or savings accounts to help finance business ventures. In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Bernie Siegel, founder of Siegel Capital LLC, discusses a rollover plan where the franchisee creates a C corporation that will own and operate the new franchise business. That corporation then creates its 401(k)-retirement plan. The C corporation’s 401(k) plan then purchases stock in the C corporation. The cash paid to the corporation is then used as the down payment, and the balance can then be financed through an SBA guaranteed loan.3

At Taboonette, we are excited to work with financially qualified individuals to help them reach their goal of owning a restaurant food franchise. Together we look forward to growing both our Taboonette franchisee and customer bases and bringing our delicious trademark Middleterranean® food and a unique dining experience to more hungry guests.

For franchise information contact [email protected] . “Offer by Prospectus only”

1.https://www.sba.gov/
2. http://guides.wsj.com/small-business/franchising/how-to-finance-a-franchise-purchase/
3.https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB120242422031851929

RETAIL ECONOMICS – ITS ABOUT COMPS, COST OF GOODS, & LABOR

Article contributed by www.rogerlipton.com – Roger’s (unfiltered) Restaurant and Retail Review – While this discussion reflects upon trends for publicly held restaurant companies, it should be useful for franchisees and potential franchisees to consider.

RETAIL ECONOMICS – ITS ABOUT COMPS, COST OF GOODS, & LABOR
By Roger Lipton

2017 SUMMARY BELOW – 19 RESTAURANT COMPANIES
There are four major components of profits for restaurants (and retailers):

Revenues (made up by same store sales, price and menu mix, and traffic)

Cost of Goods (food and paper)

Labor Cost (Store level managers and crew expense, including benefits)

Occupancy expense, consisting of minimum rents adjusted for volume overages, and common area management charges (CAM) when appropriate, normally also including utilities, real estate insurance and real estate taxes. Occupancy expense is important, usually at 6-8% of sales (if you’re lucky), but nowhere near the 30 points, give or take a few points, that make up both Cost of Goods and Labor. For this piece, suffice to say that occupancy expenses are trending higher, clearly not helping store level margins.

This discussion, however, is primarily meant to summarize restaurant executives’ expectation for revenues, cost of goods, and labor expense in 2017, which represent larger variables than occupancy expense. In that effort, we have excerpted the numbers presented below from the most recent corporate reports (including conference calls) from each of the companies shown below.

For context, over the last couple of years, while labor costs have marched consistently upward, commodity costs have reliably been a “partial offset”. At the same time, store level traffic has been challenged, which obviously puts store level margins at risk if one or both of these major line items increase as a percentage of sales. Very few restaurant companies have shown increases in traffic during 2016. Typically, it goes like this: Same store sales were up 2-3%, price and menu mix increases were 2-4%, so traffic was up (maybe 1%) or down (probably 1-3%). The labor percentage was up anywhere from 50-150 basis points, partially offset by commodity deflation of 25-100 basis points. The table above shows the commentary from nineteen publicly traded restaurant companies. You can see that the “good times” in the form of lower commodity costs seem to be behind us. Almost all the companies are looking for cost of goods to be flat or UP, rather than down.

You can also see that the labor percentage is often expected to be up by 3,4 or 5 percentage points, which would translate to 90-150 basis points of margin if the labor percentage is 30%. Suffice to say we are moving to the top of the previous range rather than the bottom.
Lastly, the table shows that comp sales expectations are (perhaps conservatively, perhaps not) estimated at 1-2% (higher at PNRA and TAST), and that implies continued traffic challenges since menu prices will generally be a couple of points higher.

Putting it all together, traffic and sales will be challenged, labor % will be up, probably by more than in ’16, commodity % will be “flattish”, less of an “offset” than in ’16. Occupancy expense, FWIW, won’t help either. For good measure, it will be difficult to raise prices at the store level, when grocery prices seem well controlled, which has no doubt helped to contribute to the sluggish store traffic we have been recently experiencing.

About the Author:
Roger Lipton is an investment professional with over 4 decades of experience specializing in chain restaurants and retailers, as well as macro-economic and monetary developments. After earning a BSME from R.P.I. and an MBA from Harvard, he began following the restaurant industry as well as the gold mining industry. While he originally followed companies such as Church’s Fried Chicken, Morrison’s Cafeterias and others, over the years he invested in companies such as Panera Bread and shorted companies such as Boston Chicken.
For more information please contact: WWW.ROGERLIPTON.COM ORWWW.LIPTONFINANCIALSERVICES.COM

If you have any questions relative to the above information, don’t hesitate to contact us.
Roger Lipton

Business Success Secrets You Must Know

Get advice from solicitors and learn about customer service from experts. Being prudent in this area will help eliminate any start-up mistakes and set you ahead of your competition.

Small Business Success Secrets
By Dan Cavalli

Small business success is easy but certainly not simple. Turn your passion into small business profits. Many business owners experience Small Business Success. Even though the world is experiencing economic difficulty, business growth is rampant. If you need help to achieve business success you have come to the right place.

What is it that an individual can do to achieve lasting success in their small business? Here are a few ideas to improve your chances of gaining small business success using time tested secrets I personally use in my own business.

1. Research. You can either market the product you have now in the hope of it being acceptable to the market place or you can research the market for the best product to sell. At any rate market research has to happen first and once done, marketing is a continual through the life of your business.

2. Cash Flow. Lack of cash flow is a major reason for business failure. It’s OK to gain sales and make money but if you don’t or can’t collect it you are destined to go broke. The rule to keep in mind is to make sure you invoice as soon as possible and you pay as late as possible. This is a simple plan that works. So sit down, and take the time to create a cash flow plan now.

3. Technology. Technology will save you thousands of dollars and halve your work time. Buy as much as you can afford. Remember, the hours spent in your business are worth money and plenty of it so be smart and embrace technology. Technology can automate every part of your business including communicating with customers.

4. Passion. There is nothing worse than going to work and becoming a clock watcher because you are unhappy. Find something you are passionate about and do that. The day won’t be long enough then to do all you want to accomplish. Why? Your passion creates enthusiasm and that will carry you through any tough spells. It’ll motivate you when your business hits bad times.

5. Marketing. The prime function for you as a business person is not to sell product but to become a marketing Guru. Marketing is one of the areas where many business owners fall down and that has a bearing on whether or not a business will be successful. You love your business and you want it to be successful. Do research and find out how are you will convince prospects to buy what you have?

6. Advice. You may think you are pretty smart. You may have specific knowledge about your specialty which is great, but you will come unstuck if you haven’t run a successful business before. You must still seek advice from experts when building your business. The reason is business is not about what you know in your field. It’s controlled by legislation, consumer rights and marketing. Get advice from solicitors and learn about customer service from experts. Being prudent in this area will help eliminate any start-up mistakes and set you ahead of your competition.

7. Delegation. When you own a small business you have to wear many hats. You are the CEO, GM, admin manager, customer service manager, research and development person, sales and marketing manager and everything else. It’s not practical to manage your business this way and hope to grow at the same time. Delegating responsibilities and tasks is an important component of running an efficient and successful business. As the business owner your time should be spent growing the business, working on the business, not in it.

8. Internet. I am not talking about using the Internet to sell your product or service [even though it is often used for this] but rather use it for research, communication Free Reprint Articles, making payments to save time. Use the internet to gain more for your business to save time and money for business building tools and the latest resources.

Your partner in business success

Dan

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Helping people and business to be the best they can be now! If you liked this information and want more get the ‘Six steps to more business quickly’:http://www.leadbuildingsystems.com . Thinking about Starting a business and want to know how: http://www.startingabusinessnow.com/ Want to Grow a Small Retail Business fast: http://www.howtogrowasmallbusiness.com/

NYU addresses the growing restaurant sector and ensures that aspiring restaurateurs possess the business fundamentals needed to succeed.

“We wanted to develop a curriculum that would serve the educational and training needs of both industry veterans and those seeking to launch their careers or new business ventures,” said Dr. Kristin Lamoureux, clinical associate professor and associate dean, NYU School of Professional Studies Jonathan M. Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism.

NYU addresses the growing restaurant sector and ensures that aspiring restaurateurs possess the business fundamentals needed to succeed.

August 3, 2016 – New York City
PRESS RELEASE BY:
Aaron Ross
Assistant Director – NYU School of Professional Studies

Jonathan M. Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism
7 East 12th Street | 721E | New York, NY 10003 P (212) 998-7226

Despite the thousands of restaurants that go out of business each year, thousands more take their place as their owners pursue dreams of succeeding where so many others have failed. Despite the relative ease of launching a new venture, creating a restaurant that is successful in the long-term requires a balance between creating a memorable culinary and service experience and minimizing operational expenditures to ensure profitability.

To help address the needs of this growing sector and ensure that aspiring restaurateurs possess the business fundamentals needed to succeed, the NYU School of Professional Studies Jonathan M. Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism (sps.nyu.edu/tisch) is launching a new Professional Diploma in Restaurant Entrepreneurship for the fall 2016 semester.

“We wanted to develop a curriculum that would serve the educational and training needs of both industry veterans and those seeking to launch their careers or new business ventures,” said Dr. Kristin Lamoureux, clinical associate professor and associate dean, NYU School of Professional Studies Jonathan M. Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism. “By providing a framework for building knowledge and skills, access to industry leaders, and validating student learning through a comprehensive business plan, we can ensure that our diploma holders are prepared to not only start but grow successful businesses that will create lasting value for the communities in which they are based.”

This concentrated diploma program was designed with working professionals in mind and will be delivered in a blended – online and in-person format – which provides students with the utmost flexibility to complete the program. The 5 required courses include Restaurant Business Planning and Concept Development; Restaurant Financial Management; Restaurant Operations; Restaurant Sales and Marketing; and JobFocus: Restaurant Entrepreneurship.

Applications for the fall 2016 semester will be accepted until August 26. For more information about the Professional Diploma in Restaurant Entrepreneurship, including application requirements, and course faculty, click here. You may also call 212-998-7226 or email [email protected].

This program adds another option for students who would like to pursue a career in the restaurant industry, and is a perfect companion to the existing Diploma in Restaurant Operations and Guest Service, which focuses entirely on developing the skills to achieve operational excellence in the front- and back-of house. For information about the Restaurant Operations and Guest Service diploma, click here.

Small Business and Franchise Show on AM970 The Answer New York City.

This program will help put you on a clear path of starting and growing a business. An enterprise that you can call your own, one that can help you achieve freedom from a dead end job, help you gain financial independence, and true security for your family. We will explore ways for you to create, start & grow your ideal business or franchise. You’ll learn how it’s done, how to bring your dream to life, and The Risks and the Rewards of business ownership.

This Week We started our Small Business and Franchise Show on AM970 The Answer New York City. You can listen to the entire first broadcast at the Link below. Our guests were Harold Kestenbaum – Attorney and Nick Powills, CFE – No Limit Agency. Give a Listen and tune in every Sunday at 3pm EST. Also feel free to call in with your questions. https://soundcloud.com/small-biz-and-franchise-show

5 Easy Tips to Improve the Customer Focus of Your Business

A large part of customer relationship management and general customer focus involves adjusting your business for your clientele. Consider what types of clients you have and when and how you can cater to them best. For example, if most of your clients are other businesses, you may want to adjust your hours of operation to accommodate them. You might also want to offer special bonuses or incentives to larger businesses that use your products or services.


5 Easy Tips to Improve the Customer Focus of Your Business

This article is written and owned by Mike Mirshams

If you are a business owner, you must already know that any business absolutely cannot operate without a reliable customer base. So, it makes sense that you should make customer focus a top priority in the workplace. Here are 5 easy tips to improve the customer focus of your business.

Size Up the Competition:

Step one of improving your customer focus is to size up the competition. What do other businesses in your field have going for them? What do they have in common with you? What do they offer that makes their company different from your company? Make note of the things that you think are better about your business and the things that you think are worse. Then, look at how you can improve to get a leg up on the competition.

Focus on the Customers:

It may seem silly, but one of the simplest tips for improving the customer focus of your business is to focus on the customers. In other words, make sure that you have a clear understanding of what your clients want and expect.

There are a number of common methods for figuring out what the needs of your clients are. They are commonly known as customer relationship management techniques. One such technique is doing periodic customer surveys. Those can be done by phone, e-mail, regular mail, or even in person, if you regularly have face-to-face meetings with your clients.

Another customer relationship management technique that cannot be ignored is social media. These days, it’s absolutely amazing how much can be accomplished online. If you don’t have the time to manage your social media websites yourself, you may want to hire a person whose sole job it is to handle online customer service and social media interactions.

Make Your Customers Feel Important:

The next tip for improving customer focus in your company is to make your customers feel important. People like to feel like their opinions are valid and their concerns are being addressed. So, you need to be able to really listen to what your customers are saying. Depending on the size of your company, you may even want to set up a designated customer service department to handle complaints.

Agree with Your Customers:

The phrase “the customer is always right” may seem like a cliché, but there’s a reason that it’s still a common phrase. It can often pay in multiple ways to replace goods or give refunds, even if your company didn’t necessarily cause the problem. Of course, there are some times when that’s not practical, but most of the time it pays to agree with your customers. After all, happy customers will refer friends and family members to your business.

Adjust Your Business for Your Clientele:

A large part of customer relationship management and general customer focus involves adjusting your business for your clientele. Consider what types of clients you have and when and how you can cater to them best. For example, if most of your clients are other businesses, you may want to adjust your hours of operation to accommodate them. You might also want to offer special bonuses or incentives to larger businesses that use your products or services.

If, on the other hand, the majority of your customers are individuals, it helps to take a more hands-on approach to customer service. Be sure to make yourself accessible and visible to the clients. Essentially, you can build up your client base as if it is a big, happy, family. Something as simple as a friendly smile can go a long way towards turning a one-time buyer into a repeat customer.


eLearningChampion.com offers high quality online training in management, specially for PMI PDU hours, NASBA credits and HRCI credits. Whether you need to get a start on a new career, want to study for pleasure or simply looking to complement your university degree, eLearning Champion has something for you.

http://articles.submityourarticle.com/5-easy-tips-to-improve-the-customer-focus-of-your-business-354723

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Track Record of Success; Ritter’s Frozen Custard & Burgers www.ritters.com

The International Franchise Expo Returns to New York City

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
June 14, 2013
Media Contacts:
Graham Chapman [email protected] 919-459-8157
Sue Yannello [email protected] 919-459-8162

The International Franchise Expo Returns to New York City
Thousands in the Tri-State Explore Hot, New Businesses in Franchising!

(Manhattan, June 20, 21, 22) – Thousands of folks in the Tri-State will explore the hot, new businesses in franchising as the International Franchise Expo returns to New York City’s newly renovated Javits Center from Thursday June 20 through Saturday June 22. Even in a down economy, franchising has experienced rapid growth in the past decade (more than 40%), enabling franchise establishments to employ more than 8 million Americans. After 19 20 years in Washington D.C., the IFE moved to the Big Apple last year because of its larger economic market and strong international presence. And due to the show’s unprecedented success in 2012, the IFE returns to New York City for the second straight year.

This year, more than 400 franchise businesses from more than 80 countries will be on display. These businesses include restaurant powerhouses BLIMPIE and Golden Corral, who were major contributors to the more than 7,700 New York based food and accommodation jobs that were added in 2012. Both companies have developed a strong presence in the tri-state area, as the brands combined have helped more than 130 entrepreneurs launch their own business in NY, NJ and CT. And considering Blimpie is approaching its 50th anniversary after getting its start in Hoboken, NJ in 1964, we have plenty of GREAT LOCAL HOOKS TO HELP YOU TELL THIS NATIONAL BUSINESS STORY!

This is a great opportunity for you to interview people who want to buy themselves a job with a franchise…or are tired of the 9 – 5 rat race and want to become their own boss.

SEE PUDGIE’S FAMOUS CHICKEN AT booth 840

Why Video Seeding Is Essential for Your Business

Why Video Seeding Is Essential for Your Business
Author: Paul Barnett

The rise of social media sites such as Facebook in recent years has helped shaped the way we communicate with each other. Now businesses are seeing the potential of social media sites as a way to promote their products. One way of doing this is by using something called video seeding.

What is video seeding?

Video seeding is a way in which you can advertise your company, product or service using the power of blogs, video and social media sites. It relies on word of mouth, digital PR and on site marketing to get the video viewed on high competition sites such as YouTube.

Social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube give you the ability to share a video that you like. This makes the video into what is known as a viral video. The more people that share it the more it spreads, rather like a virus. Obviously the more people that see the video can only be good for your business. If they like what they are seeing then they will want to come to your website to investigate further.

If you host a video on YouTube you are given some embed code, which you can then use to embed your video onto a blog or another social media site. It really is as simple as that. Think of the power that will give you for spreading your message right across the World Wide Web. Think of what it could do for your conversions. If you are not using online video then you really ought to look into it right now.

Of course not all videos can be treated equal. Just because one video gets viewed by many people, it does not mean yours will also. In order to have a successful video seeding campaign and get views, you need to engage your viewer somehow. Perhaps add some humour to the video or even an unusual hook. If you look at some of the best advertising campaigns on TV over the years it is not difficult to see why those adverts were successful. The only branding you need to do is right at the end of the video when you can embed your website link.

With one click of the mouse a user can send your video all over the internet. That kind of power is just not possible in traditional advertising such as a magazine. How many times do people cut things out of magazines and pass them on? The truth is not very often these days.

Social media allows you to comment on videos, share, tag etc, with just one mouse click. This is the modern way of marketing and advertisers know they can reach a wider audience this way. Even some movies are advertised on Facebook during the production stage so that they drum up enough interest.

Conclusion

The power of social media and video is an advertisers dream. They know they have the chance to get their message across using a whole new paradigm. If you want to get new clients and improve your conversions, then isn’t it about time you looked into creating a good video and taking advantage of video seeding?

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/video-articles/why-video-seeding-is-essential-for-your-business-5531594.html

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